WHINE Kindle US

Image of When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition: A how-to guide for living with and loving someone with Borderline Personality Disorder
When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition: A how-to guide for living with and loving someone with Borderline Personality Disorder
WHINE now available on the Kindle to US customers!

Connect with Bon

A free eBook – 4X4 for Nons

Here is a free eBook from Bon: Free eBook

Author sheds light on van Gogh’s illness

“Borderline personality disorder is a relatively new diagnosis, which was officially described for the first time in 1980,” she continues a little later. “It was first suggested as a possible cause of van Gogh’s condition in the late 1990s.”

Author sheds light on van Gogh’s illness
Reviewed by Aaron W. Hughey

“On the Verge of Insanity: Van Gogh and His Illness” by Nienke Bakker, Louis van Tilborgh and Laura Prins. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016. 176 pages, $30.

“The dramatic moment when Vincent van Gogh cut off his ear and his subsequent suicide are among the best-known events in his life and, for many, the most fascinating,” Nienke Bakker explains in “Van Gogh’s Illness: The Witnesses Recall,” her contribution to “On the Verge of Insanity: Van Gogh and His Illness,” the new book she co-wrote with Louis van Tilborgh and Laura Prins. “His self-harm marked the beginning of a series of mental breakdowns, which have prompted widely diverging interpretations and medical diagnoses.”

Like many readers, I have known about the troubled genius van Gogh since early childhood. His story, like many who have come to occupy a prominent place in the cultural lexicon, has an enduring quality that is simultaneously difficult to explain and undeniably self-evident. His portfolio includes more than 2,100 works of art, including about 860 oil paintings – most of which were completed in a little more than 10 years. He is so well-known today it is hard to believe he actually sold only one painting during a life spent struggling with personal demons in abject poverty, supported primarily by his younger brother Theo. He only achieved worldwide acclaim after he committed suicide at age 37. To this day, he remains the embodiment of “misunderstood genius.”

READ THE ARTICLE

‘She was volatile, unstable and impulsive’: Marilyn Monroe most likely had borderline personality disorder, new book reveals

Monroe & BPD?Marilyn Monroe suffered from severe mental distress. Her symptoms included a feeling of emptiness, a split or confused identity, extreme emotional volatility, unstable relationships, and an impulsivity that drove her to drug addiction and suicide all textbook characteristics of a condition called borderline personality disorder.

‘She was volatile, unstable and impulsive’: Marilyn Monroe most likely had borderline personality disorder, new book reveals

While for many, Marilyn Monroe is one of the most enduring sex symbols of our time, behind her perfect curves and sultry personality, lay a complex and troubled woman. And more than that – it is likely that the iconic actress suffered from borderline personality disorder, says science journalist Claudia Kalb.

In a new book that examines, posthumously, the psychological conditions suffered by iconic celebrities and creatives, Kalb writes that while Monroe ‘yearned for love and stability’ she ‘often lashed out at those she cared about’.

She explains: ‘What is clear is that Monroe suffered from severe mental distress. Her symptoms included a feeling of emptiness, a split or confused identity, extreme emotional volatility, unstable relationships, and an impulsivity that drove her to drug addiction and suicide all textbook characteristics of a condition called borderline personality disorder.’

Marilyn, who was born Norma Jeane Mortenson, had 12 sets of foster parents, and according to a newscast at the time, she was quoted as saying in her last interview that she was ‘never used to being happy, so it wasn’t something she ever took for granted’. The beloved actress had roles in 23 films, which grossed a combined total of $200 million since her debut in 1950.

READ THE ARTICLE

Andy Warhol Was a Hoarder: Inside the Minds of History’s Great Personalities


Was Andy Warhol a hoarder? Did Einstein have autism? Was Frank Lloyd Wright a narcissist? In this surprising, inventive, and meticulously researched look at the evolution of mental health, acclaimed health and science journalist Claudia Kalb gives readers a glimpse into the lives of high-profile historic figures through the lens of modern psychology, weaving groundbreaking research into biographical narratives that are deeply embedded in our culture. From Marilyn Monroe’s borderline personality disorder to Charles Darwin’s anxiety, Kalb provides compelling insight into a broad range of maladies, using historical records and interviews with leading mental health experts, biographers, sociologists, and other specialists. Packed with intriguing revelations, this smart narrative brings a new perspective to one of the hottest new topics in today’s cultural conversation.
New From: $9.95 USD In Stock

Is Donald Trump Actually a Narcissist? Therapists Weigh In!

As his presidential campaign trundles forward, millions of sane Americans are wondering: What exactly is wrong with this strange individual? Now, we have an answer.

Is Donald Trump Actually a Narcissist? Therapists Weigh In!

BY HENRY ALFORD

For mental-health professionals, Donald Trump is at once easily diagnosed but slightly confounding. “Remarkably narcissistic,” said developmental psychologist Howard Gardner, a professor at Harvard Graduate School of Education. “Textbook narcissistic personality disorder,” echoed clinical psychologist Ben Michaelis. “He’s so classic that I’m archiving video clips of him to use in workshops because there’s no better example of his characteristics,” said clinical psychologist George Simon, who conducts lectures and seminars on manipulative behavior. “Otherwise, I would have had to hire actors and write vignettes. He’s like a dream come true.”

That mental-health professionals are even willing to talk about Trump in the first place may attest to their deep concern about a Trump presidency. As Dr. Robert Klitzman, a professor of psychiatry and the director of the master’s of bioethics program at Columbia University, pointed out, the American Psychiatric Association declares it unethical for psychiatrists to comment on an individual’s mental state without examining him personally and having the patient’s consent to make such comments. This so-called Goldwater rule arose after the publication of a 1964 Fact magazine article in which psychiatrists were polled about Senator Barry Goldwater’s fitness to be president. Senator Goldwater brought a $2 million suit against the magazine and its publisher; the Supreme Court awarded him $1 in compensatory damages and $75,000 in punitive damages.

But you don’t need to have met Donald Trump to feel like you know him; even the smallest exposure can make you feel like you’ve just crossed a large body of water in a small boat with him. Indeed, though narcissistic personality disorder was removed from the most recent issue of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, for somewhat arcane reasons, the traits that have defined the disorder in the past—grandiosity; an expectation that others will recognize one’s superiority; a lack of empathy—are writ large in Mr. Trump’s behavior.

“He’s very easy to diagnose,” said psychotherapist Charlotte Prozan. “In the first debate, he talked over people and was domineering. He’ll do anything to demean others, like tell Carly Fiorina he doesn’t like her looks. ‘You’re fired!’ would certainly come under lack of empathy. And he wants to deport immigrants, but [two of] his wives have been immigrants.” Michaelis took a slightly different twist on Trump’s desire to deport immigrants: “This man is known for his golf courses, but, with due respect, who does he think works on these golf courses?”

READ THE ARTICLE

‘I am broken inside’: Revisiting lessons from Jiah Khan’s death and suicide note

“All I want now is to go to sleep and never wake up again. I am nothing.”

‘I am broken inside’: Revisiting lessons from Jiah Khan’s death and suicide note

Rachel Hercman Aug 25, 2015 at 12:09 pm

Jiah Khan’s suicide is now in news again because of Sooraj’s impending movie release. Whether it is a genuine attempt to clear the air or just a PR act, we do not know. However, when we remember the young, beautiful, famous actress deciding she had no other solution than to take her own life, it is a testament to the amount of emotional pain she must have been experiencing.

Her suicide note portrays a curious paradox of a relationship characterised by unrequited love and abuse. The pain and turmoil is palpable and it seems like there should be tears dripping down from the words. Jiah truly speaks the universal language of a heartbroken lover; anger, demoralisation, disappointment, despair, and total emptiness.

ut as sad and heart-breaking this tragedy may be, life will go on and the story will soon become old news. However, if women around the world can take a lesson or two from Jiah’s experience, the tragedy can make women stronger and in some cases, avoid some of the unfortunate circumstances she had in her life.

‘I am running away from everything.’

It’s normal that when life is painful, running away feels like the right thing to do to alleviate the discomfort. For Jiah, running away meant killing herself. For some people it means having an affair; or never leaving the house; or moving somewhere impulsively; or isolating from all relationships, even ones with close friends and family.

READ THE ARTICLE

Marshall meshing with Jets, looking to prove himself again

He has been very open about having been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder a few years ago, and has been active in spreading mental health awareness.

Marshall meshing with Jets, looking to prove himself again

By DENNIS WASZAK Jr. – Associated Press – Wednesday, May 27, 2015
FLORHAM PARK, N.J. (AP) – Brandon Marshall insists he didn’t need a fresh start, a departure from a suddenly decaying situation with the Chicago Bears.

He’s in New York now, and looking to prove himself again – on a Jets team that’s young, hungry and highly proficient in trash talking on the practice field.

“Every single day, it’s awesome,” the wide receiver said after practice Wednesday. “I mean, it’s so competitive, and it’s tough to create that in the offseason.”

Social media certainly makes it easier these days, as Marshall and cornerback Antonio Cromartie took to Twitter and Instagram to challenge each other in practice last week. For the record, Marshall started it, saying he was going to make it a long day for Cromartie and Darrelle Revis.

Well, not so much.

READ THE ARTICLE

Brandon Marshall Talks Jets, Cutler and His Personality

I think it’s people who are going to accept me for who I am and see that it’s a personality, not a character issue.

Brandon Marshall Talks Jets, Cutler and His Personality
Pro-Bowl receiver expects Jets to make him their top receiving target in 2015

By STU WOO
March 13, 2015 5:09 p.m. ET

In his first conversation with reporters since being acquired by the Jets in a trade with the Chicago Bears, wide receiver Brandon Marshall on Friday addressed his past off-field issues and joined the rest of the team’s fan base in wondering who will be the starting quarterback when the season begins.

“This is a great organization with great people,” said Marshall, the five-time Pro-Bowler who has found himself in plenty of legal and disciplinary trouble during his nine-year career. “I think it’s people who are going to accept me for who I am and see that it’s a personality, not a character issue.”

Marshall conceded that fans’ perceptions of his first five years in the NFL, a drama-filled time with the Denver Broncos and then the Miami Dolphins, were pretty much accurate. “I was lost getting in and didn’t cope with things,” he said.

Marshall was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder in 2011, his final year with the Dolphins, and he said he changed his life in Miami. But after he was traded to the Bears in March of 2012, Marshall continued to clash with coaches and teammates, mostly notably during a postgame tirade following a Bears loss to Miami this past season in which he criticized quarterback Jay Cutler.

On Friday, Marshall didn’t exactly deny that he had a messy relationship in Cutler, but said the two remain very close. “I’ve always described this relationship this way, and it hasn’t changed: We’re brothers,” Marshall said. “We love each other and we also get into it…I love him. I love his family. I love his sons. I wish him the best.”

READ MORE