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This Podcast Network Is Shutting Down Following Abuse Allegations Against Its Founder

Feral Media

In his statement, he outlined that he planned to take responsibility for his actions, validated many of Weems’ allegations, and addressed both his diagnosis with Borderline Personality Disorder and his drug and alcohol addictions.

This Podcast Network Is Shutting Down Following Abuse Allegations Against Its Founder
ELENA NICOLAOU
DECEMBER 27, 2017, 4:00 PM

If you’re a podcast fiend, chances are you’re familiar with at least one podcast housed under the Feral Audio umbrella. The podcast network, founded in 2012, is home to shows like Chelsea Peretti’s Call Chelsea Peretti, the beloved sleep-aiding daily show Sleep With Me, the feminist satire Reductress Presents: Mouth Time!, and We’re No Doctors, a show about health and medicine hosted by Busy Phillips and comedian Steve Agee.

Following a searing indictment of Feral Audio founder Dustin Marshall’s abusive behavior, the future availability of these podcasts is uncertain. On December 21, Marshall’s ex-girlfriend, Potty Mouth band member Abby Weems, posted a long overview of her relationship with Marshall. She claims Marshall was jealous, controlling, and violently unpredictable while they were dating due to his Borderline Personality Disorder, and exhibited behaviors of stalking after they broke up. “I want poeple, especially women, to know that he’s dangerous,” Weems wrote.

Four days later, Marshall responded to Weems’ allegations with a long post on his personal Tumblr. In his statement, he outlined that he planned to take responsibility for his actions, validated many of Weems’ allegations, and addressed both his diagnosis with Borderline Personality Disorder and his drug and alcohol addictions.

Marshall also stated he was stepping away from Feral Audio so that he could receive mental health treatment. “To Feral Audio artists, after six years, I can no longer have the pressure of running a company, continue this lifestyle and be mentally healthy…Since Feral Audio is forever married to my name, i [sic] am dissolving it so no dark cloud should ever be above your work,” he wrote.

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Holiday Skills for Dealing with Difficult Relatives and Friends

Hello, all. Below are two posts from the past that deal with Holiday dynamics. As the Holiday season goes on and Christmas and New Year’s approach, perhaps it’s time to review these and see what you can do to be more effective during the Holiday season?

Enjoy!

Bon

Just in time for the holidays

Family Dynamics Around the Holiday Table

Some mental health services are telling patients: ‘If you really wanted to kill yourself, you would have done it’

Like many others, Laura is made to feel like she is “attention seeking” and “manipulative” when she is suicidal or makes attempts on her life.

Some mental health services are telling patients: ‘If you really wanted to kill yourself, you would have done it’

When people do get to access crisis care, many feel that the emphasis is on getting rid of them as quickly as possible. Psychiatric inpatients have even been told to phone the Samaritans if they wish to talk

Jay Watts 4 days ago

People are encouraged to seek help if they are feeling suicidal like never before. Yet a deadly new mix of funding cuts and dangerous ideas about suicide are leaving many people with long-term conditions at greater risk.

Tom is 22 and has made a couple of serious attempts on his life following prolonged periods of depression. “When I regained consciousness after the last attempt”, he said, “I was told ‘If you really want to kill yourself, you would have done it’.” Tom, like many other people, feels like when he now contacts the crisis team, they treat him brusquely. “It is like they will only take me seriously if I actually die”, he continued. “I am told again and again ‘well if you really want to kill yourself, that’s your choice’.”

We are not talking about nuanced Schopenhauerian conversations about the right to die here. In the context of deep despair, the idea of choice is a deadly one, absolving the other party from doing everything they can to help the person in pain. If one is suicidal it is very difficult to feel any hope that things might change; one is often exhausted. It is crucial that hope is held actively by mental health professionals at these bleakest moments in a life.

Yet the idea of choice is being used increasingly to rebuff those who seek help when suicidal, a discursive move that an increasingly burnout mental health workforce appears to be using more often. This makes those suffering feel rejected and further alienated – key trigger factors to suicide.

Laura, 60, has also made multiple attempts on her life. She has been told that she should “take responsibility” when she is feeling suicidal, an idea fuelled by the neoliberal discourse of rights and responsibilities which has taken hold of mental health services. “There is a strict management plan and boundaries in place”, she said. “I am allowed to call the crisis team three times a week, and the calls are time-limited. When I do call, I am only allowed to talk about the present not the past”, she says. “If I try to talk about anything else, or call at another time, I am told I am ‘threatening suicide’.”

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Can Tylenol Really Relieve Hurt Feelings?

Among participants who had high levels of self-reported BPD features, those in the acetaminophen group showed more trust in their partners than those who had taken a placebo.

Can Tylenol Really Relieve ‘Hurt Feelings?’

Researchers say the ingredient acetaminophen can lessen extreme emotional responses, allowing people to get over rejection and other social feelings.

Is it possible that Tylenol can help alleviate not just physical pain, but social pain as well?

A growing body of research suggests that acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, may help dampen emotional responses.

In a study published earlier this fall, researchers from The Ohio State University found evidence that acetaminophen may reduce behavioral distrust in people with high levels of borderline personality disorder (BPD) features.

The investigators recruited 284 undergraduate students, each of whom they assessed for BPD features using a self-reported scale.

Following a double-blind procedure, the researchers randomly assigned each participant to receive either 1,000 milligrams of acetaminophen or a placebo.

Afterward, they asked participants to take part in an economic trust game.

Among participants who had high levels of self-reported BPD features, those in the acetaminophen group showed more trust in their partners than those who had taken a placebo.

Among participants with low levels of BPD features, there were no differences in trust observed between those who had taken acetaminophen and those who had taken a placebo.

“In line with past research, we found that people who self-reported higher levels of characteristics associated with BPD entrusted less money to anonymous partners,” Ian Roberts, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto and a lead study author, told Healthline.

“However,” he continued, “our study also found that, for those higher on BPD features, this distrust was reduced when they had been given acetaminophen as compared to a placebo.”

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Health Insurers Are Still Skimping On Mental Health Coverage

Because of low reimbursement rates, Harbin said, professionals in the mental health and substance abuse fields are not willing to contract with insurers

Health Insurers Are Still Skimping On Mental Health Coverage
November 30, 201710:38 AM ET
JENNY GOLD

It has been nearly a decade since Congress passed the Mental Health Parity And Addiction Equity Act, with its promise to make mental health and substance abuse treatment just as easy to get as care for any other condition. Yet today, amid an opioid epidemic and a spike in the suicide rate, patients are still struggling to get access to treatment.

That is the conclusion of a national study published Thursday by Milliman, a risk management and health care consulting company. The report was released by a coalition of mental health and addiction advocacy organizations.

Among the findings:

In 2015, behavioral care was four to six times more likely to be provided out-of-network than medical or surgical care.

Insurers paid primary care providers 20 percent more for the same types of care than they paid addiction and mental health care specialists, including psychiatrists.

State statistics vary widely. In New Jersey, 45 percent of office visits for behavioral health care were out-of-network. In Washington, D.C., it was 63 percent.

The researchers at Milliman examined two large national databases containing medical claim records from major insurers for PPOs — preferred provider organizations — covering nearly 42 million Americans in all 50 states and D.C. from 2013 to 2015.

“I was surprised it was this bad. As someone who has worked on parity for 10-plus years, I thought we would have done better,” says Henry Harbin, former CEO of Magellan Health, a managed behavioral health care company.

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What holds us back before we start – From When Hope is Not Enough

The skills I offer in this book are counter-intuitive. They go against many of the things that we have been taught to believe about relationships.

What holds us back before we start

Poor Attachment Leads to Misunderstanding One Another.

I often see on my support list “newbies” who are not teachable. They arrive at the list seemingly willing to listen to the experienced members, yet in reality they subconsciously feel they have it all figured out. The experience of the “old timers” is extraordinarily valuable. In fact, that experience is the greatest asset available on the list. It is why I decided to revise this book to reflect the teaching from the sharing of that experience. Many newcomers to the list are unwilling to listen to guidance from the experienced members. When someone is unable or unwilling to listen to wise advice, this person usually has one of the next few approaches as a hindrance to progress.

Willfulness

Willfulness is the opposite of willingness. If you have an open mind, you have the willingness. You’re teachable. Yet, if your mind is closed and unwilling to listen to suggestions, things will not change. I’ve heard it said that insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. To me, that’s a willful, close-minded approach to the Non/BPD relationship.

The skills I offer in this book are counterintuitive. They go against many of the things that we have been taught to believe about relationships. If a concept is alien to your current way of thinking, if you do believe that it will work, only willingness will provide the key to open the closed mind. Without a willingness to listen, to reflect and to experiment with concepts that you may think will never work, nothing will change.

I’ve also heard it said: nothing changes if nothing changes. Nothing changes without willingness and an open mind.

Continue reading What holds us back before we start – From When Hope is Not Enough