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When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition: A how-to guide for living with and loving someone with Borderline Personality Disorder
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Study Will Evaluate Bipolar Medication in Treating Borderline Personality Disorder

The secondary outcomes are depressive symptoms, deliberate self-harm, social functioning, health-related quality of life, resource use and costs, side effects of treatment, adverse events, and withdrawal of trial medication due to adverse effects.

Study Will Evaluate Bipolar Medication in Treating Borderline Personality Disorder
Aug 12, 2015 | Bill Schu

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is challenging to diagnose and treat. As yet, there are no drugs currently licensed for BPD treatment. In fact, guidance from England’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends that pharmacologic therapy not be used for patients with BPD at all. This is potentially troubling, because those patients typically experience rapid and extreme changes in mood, poor social functioning and have high rates of suicidal behavior.

Some smaller-scale research has suggested that mood stabilizers may produce short-term reductions in symptoms of BPD, but few controlled, randomized clinical trials have been undertaken in this area. A new study announced in Trials will compare the effectiveness of the bipolar disorder and anti-seizure medication lamotrigine, which has been shown to be effective at preventing or delaying some depressive effects in patients with bipolar disorder, versus placebo in patients with BPD.

The lamotrigine and borderline personality disorder: Investigating Long-term Effectiveness trial (LABILE) is a multi-center, two-arm, parallel group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial with three-, six-, and 12-month follow-up assessment. It will be the first study to examine the long-term clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lamotrigine for people with BPD.

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Family smash Snowdon goal

I wanted to raise some awareness about mental health and for others not to suffer alone because getting the right help is part of getting better.

Family smash Snowdon goal

by Beth Wright

AN INTREPID family have scaled Snowdown to raise money for a charity close to their hearts.

Joe Lacks, joined by his dad Godfrey, brothers Simon and Paul Douglas, and friends Eddie Morgan and Scott Emes, tackled the mountain of a challenge to boost funds for mental health charity Mind.

The team decided to embark on the hike after Joe was diagnosed with a borderline personality disorder in 2013.

He said: “I wanted to raise some awareness about mental health and for others not to suffer alone because getting the right help is part of getting better. So I did a bit of research and Mind was the charity for us.”

The group smashed their goal of conquering Snowdon in six hours after making the trek both up and down the moutain in four hours and forty minutes on June 19.

Joe and his team raised £330 for Mind and a further £93 for Gift Aid.

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What I learnt when I tried to kill myself

It’s all too easy to glamourise suicide once it’s happened. To pack out a funeral ceremony, dripping platitudes, telling everyone you “wish you’d known”. But if the potential suicide victim “fails”?

What I learnt when I tried to kill myself
What do you do when everyone knows what you did?

By Charlotte Dingle

A few weeks ago I joined the same exclusive club as Drew Barrymore, Eminem, Britney Spears and a host of other celebs. Like your average A-list party, there was plenty of booze and a few pills involved. There was a trip to casualty, too – again, not atypical. But this was a party of one. Mired in sadness, devoid of hope, and brooding on a stupid fight with my partner, I sat in my bedroom and necked anti-depressants (oh the irony) like Smarties, all washed down with a tidal wave of whisky. I barely remember what followed immediately afterwards. All I know is that I survived, thanks to the swift actions of said partner.

My friend G (full name withheld as her family still refuses to accept that she committed suicide) did the same thing seven years ago, at exactly the same age I am now. She was smart, vivacious, funny, bloody gorgeous – the last person you’d expect to ever feel unhappy. We’d been giggling over fancy dress plans just the day before it happened. But G died, drunk and emotional after storming out of the pub following an argument with her boyfriend. Later on, he tried to kill himself by starting a fire in his flat. He ended up in a prison psychiatric hospital. It was so, so sad.

Every year in the UK, 5,000 people succeed in committing suicide. As many as 100,000 are estimated to have attempted it. They shoot themselves, they overdose, they slash veins and they inhale gas. Most of the time, the people around them have no idea that this drastic final gesture is on the cards. Because part of the reason that so many take their own lives is the tremendous taboo surrounding depression and suicide. I first broke my silence over mental health issues when I came clean about my diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder on this very website. A lot of people warned me against it. “It will affect your whole career,” they said. “Your name will be out there, attached to that.” I won’t lie: I was terrified. But something inside me screamed that I had to write it regardless. That maybe that was the kind of thing my career should actually be about, above all else.

As it turned out, that article has now been shared almost 16,000 times and counting. For something born of such pain, such feelings of inadequacy and shame, reactions to it have made me feel pretty good about myself. But the day after I made my attempt, I was nevertheless terrified when I awoke to a barrage of Facebook message notifications. “Are you OK?” seemed to be the running theme. Filled with creeping dread, I checked out my last status update. Oh fuck. Turns out I’d drunkenly told the world exactly what had happened. As people often do when they + social media with booze and despair.

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Mental health labels can hamper treatment

The label “borderline personality disorder” was especially problematic, as professionals could assume the patient was damaged in all areas of life and close contact should be avoided.

Mental health labels can hamper treatment

DIAGNOSING patients with labels such as “personality disorder” and “schizophrenia” can lead to less effective treatments, research shows.

UP to five people in every 100 are diagnosed with personality disorders in the UK, according to estimates, with one to three in every 100 living with schizophrenia.

It is commonly believed such diagnoses are stigmatising and lead to negative perceptions by the public, family members and those with mental health problems.

Previously, it had been assumed those working in the profession would be immune to such beliefs but research by the University of Bath found labelling patients with these conditions can have negative impacts on professionals and lead to less effective treatment.

The label “borderline personality disorder” was especially problematic, as professionals could assume the patient was damaged in all areas of life and close contact should be avoided.

This might lead to clinicians wrongly assuming tendencies and behaviours from the patient, offering treatment for these instead of taking into account their individual needs.

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When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition Print Edition Available at Amazon

When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition Print Edition Available at Amazon! In the next few days, I’ll retire the first edition.



When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition


Does someone you love have Borderline Personality Disorder? Are you in a relationship with a difficult person? Does this person rage at you for no reason at all? Is everything always Your fault? Do you feel lied to and manipulated? Do you believe that there is nowhere to turn? When Hope is Not Enough (Whine) is here to help. Whine provides a step-by-step plan for dealing with people with Borderline Personality Disorder (Bpd) or Bpd traits. Whine can help rebuild your relationship and help you create a calmer life. Learn how to live with and love someone with Bpd. The second edition brings 33% more material, skills and advanced tools. Readers of the first edition will find new approaches, detailed explanations and much more material.
List Price: $19.95 USD
New From: $16.91 USD In Stock
Release date August 6, 2015.

How Borderline Personality Disorder Put an End to My Party Days (#BPD)

The negative emotions I have are immobilizing. They crash over me like huge waves, knocking the wind out of me and forcing me underwater.

How Borderline Personality Disorder Put an End to My Party Days
August 10, 2015
by Harriet Williamson

In the summer of 2010, just before I turned 19 and in my first year of university, I attempted suicide with a month’s supply of my antidepressants and ended up in intensive care, breathing on a machine. By my second year, my good-time friends had had enough of me. I was no longer invited out, and became very isolated and increasingly unhappy. I got into an abusive relationship and attempted suicide another two times. I was also bulimic—vomiting everything that touched my lips.

During the first year of my undergraduate degree I reduced my calorie intake to 250 a day—about two and a half slices of bread or five medium apples—and started to go slowly insane. I drank, took drugs, and went to clubs with a religious fervor. My body started to cave in. I was starving and my hair started to fall out. My nails went blue. My skin turned to flaking scales. I once ate a burger after a night out and forced myself to run up and down the stairs until I actually passed out to “make up for it.” I went to my campus GP and told him I needed help. At five and a half stone (less than 80 pounds), he said I wasn’t sick enough to warrant eating disorders treatment, and borderline personality disorder (BPD) was never even mentioned.

People couldn’t keep up with my impulsive behavior, the manic phases and the fits of crying. The labels of “drama queen,” “attention seeker,” and “total fucking mess” followed me around like a bad smell. I tried to conceal it, but being called those things hurt. I didn’t know how to explain that all the stuff I was doing was an attempt to manage my out-of-control emotions, because when I’m going through a bad patch it feels like being on a sickening roller coaster—only, I can’t get off.

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