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When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition: A how-to guide for living with and loving someone with Borderline Personality Disorder
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Mindfulness Meditation

One of the best ways to calm your mind and gain perspective in your relationship with your loved one with BPD is through mindfulness meditation. I’ve found that Headspace is great place to start with a mindfulness meditation practice. One really cool product that I stumbled upon on Amazon is the Alexia Meditation Seat.

While it is quite pricey, I’ve not found another such product that makes it quite a bit easier to develop a correct sitting meditation position.

Alexia Meditation Seat “Ergonimically Correct for the Human Physiology” Zen Yoga Ergonomic Neoprene Foam Cushion Home or Office (Black – Leather)


The beautiful finished hand crafted Alexia Meditation Seat comes in Multiple choice Fabrics. The Alexia Meditation Seat Dimensions: L 26″ x W 32″ 1/2 x H 11″ ½. It provides you with ergonomics and support to your body in the Lower Back Column – Ischial Junction Node – knees – instep – feet. Just seat and allow, there is no need for you to use muscle tension to hold your body in a particular position – the Alexia Meditation Seat does it all for you, just let the seat hold you.
New From: $464.00 USD In Stock

Cats Again Get a Bad Rap in Toxoplasmosis Coverage

A study linking the disease to a psychiatric disorder marked by aggression didn’t include cats — but you’d never know it from the headlines.

Cats Again Get a Bad Rap in Toxoplasmosis Coverage

s.e. smith | Apr 20th 2016

Toxoplasmosis is back. A new study led by researchers from the University of Chicago links the disease with Intermittent Explosive Disorder, in which patients experience outbursts of extreme anger. Headlines such as “Could germ from cat poop trigger rage disorder in people?” and “Cats Might Be the Reason Some People Are So Terrible” are circulating, but this is not in fact a study about cats. It’s a study about toxoplasmosis and the parasite that causes it, Toxoplasma gondii.

The study ran ran in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, which has a rigorous peer-review process and has been published for more than 75 years. In other words, it carries some serious weight, and the researchers knew what they were doing. Put in layperson’s terms, the effort was building on existing studies (like this one from 2013 and another from 2015) suggesting that there was a correlation between T. gondii infection and psychiatric conditions. Specifically, researchers were curious to see whether the infection was associated with more aggressive behavior.

This study was published in 2016, drawing upon years of data, including blood samples that indicated whether patients have been infected with T. gondii. The extended collection period would have allowed researchers to get a big-picture finding and control for other factors that might influence personality and behavior. The study involved 358 patients including a control group, people diagnosed with Intermittent Explosive Disorder, and those with other mental health conditions. These are all sound research practices, and the recent publication date indicates that the study took advantage of the latest developments in psychiatry and clinical research.

Those involved in the study have noted a consistent link between suicidal behavior and impulsive aggression over the course of their research, and they were also aware of studies like the ones linked above suggesting that T. gondii is connected to aggression.

READ THE ARTICLE

I’m Drowning Not Waving

I reached crisis point one night last October when I sent pictures to my ex-husband of blood pouring from self-inflicted wounds on my arms demanding to know if he was “happy now”.

I’m Drowning Not Waving

Alexandra Sheach

It’s Depression Awareness Week and I figured it was time to blow this mental health stigma shit high out of the water.

I hadn’t known there was an official event this week, I’m so used to seeing memes on social media I meet with a sage nod or wry smile as we all ‘like’ a post telling us it’s nothing to be ashamed of – but we don’t stick our heads above the parapet and yell “yes, I’m the nut in the fruit-cake!”, but today after another run-in with inadequate mental health services I posted on my Facebook timeline about how I was being let down. I’ve always held it in, this dark and shameful secret – figuring that if anyone ditched me today or decided to distance themselves from me, they were unable to hurt me more than my own mind already does.

In 2002 I was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder and was told I should not refer to it directly in naice company, but instead allude to bipolar – or some other form of more socially-acceptable illness.

I got as lucky as anyone diagnosed with a severe mental illness can be. I was at the time living in The Netherlands, Maastricht to be precise, and they just happened to have a university research team who were world leaders in the research and treatment of BPD – I even had MRI tests and pretty pictures of my brain to try and figure out if my neurons were firing the way they were supposed to in response to triggers in picture format.

I got 4+ years of weekly 1:1 therapy with a clinical psychologist and a whopping array of psychiatric medicine until the therapy kicked in and I could be weaned off. In 2008 my therapy ended and I was released back into the big, bad world – mostly stable but aware of my limitations.

Life trundled on, I got married, had two children and the time came to move back to the UK just over two years ago, to Shetland. I don’t know whether I started to relapse before we moved or shortly after – but the cost of desperately trying to ‘hold my shit together’ meant that I essentially shut out the world, shut down – and eventually ran away from my husband taking our children, rather than talking to him and so my marriage collapsed.

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Feeling rejected? Mushrooms could help

In the uninitiated, that experience of ostracism typically evokes powerful hurt feelings.

Feeling rejected? Mushrooms could help

by Melissa Healy

magic mushrooms

magic mushrooms

Psilocybin, the mind-altering chemical that gives some mushrooms magical properties, can do more than induce trippy states. A new study finds that it reduces the sting of social rejection.

By tracking how, exactly, psilocybin affects the brain’s chemistry and activity levels, the research suggests new ways to treat the faulty social processing that comes with many mental illnesses.

Psychiatric disorders such as depression, borderline personality disorder and social anxiety disorder are often perpetuated by a nasty mind trick: sufferers are inclined to perceive rejection, criticism and negative judgments from people with whom they interact.

That negative bias not only drives those with these conditions to withdraw. By making them testy, thin-skinned and defensive, it prompts even the kindest and most patient of others to reject them, validating and perpetuating their sense of social rejection. It can be a hard cycle to break.

For centuries and the world over, mushroom species containing psilocybin have been ingested during religious rituals. They are regularly credited with giving users an expanded sense of togetherness, and a sense of meaning and purpose in the universe.

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Borderline or Bipolar: Objective Data Support a Difference

When euthymic bipolar patients played (ostensibly with another person, though the actual partner was a computer), they made choices very like control patients, choosing to cooperate almost 75% of the time. But patients with BPD cooperated only about 50% of the time (ANOVA difference, P = .03).

Borderline or Bipolar: Objective Data Support a Difference

News | April 12, 2016 | Bipolar Disorder, Borderline Personality, DSM-5
By James Phelps, MD

When a patient presents with episodes of depression, irritability, and emotional lability (especially tears and anger, with rapid changes), might he or she have borderline personality disorder (BPD)? Or could it be rapid cycling bipolar disorder (BD)?

Although there are other possibilities, such as substance use, differentiating these 2 common conditions can be extremely difficult. DSM criteria have a roughly 90% overlap: only 2 DSM criteria features are clearly present in one and absent in the other: namely, abandonment fear and chronic emptiness.1

Indeed, Deltito and colleagues,2 as well as others, have argued that borderlinity is just another version of bipolarity or at least that the “broadening of the bipolar diagnosis to include a spectrum of poorly defined conditions has added to the plausibility of this idea.”3 In refutation of this notion, data that demonstrate a clear difference between the 2 conditions, involving interpersonal trust, have recently been published.3

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What’s so great about mindfulness?

Mindfulness

Mindfulness

It has been integrated into many different treatments since the mid 90s for chronic pain, depression and, perhaps most famously, borderline personality disorder via DBT (Dialectical Behaviour Therapy).

What’s so great about mindfulness?
Kyle MacDonald
5:00 PM Thursday Mar 3, 20167 comments

I’ve been told I should meditate for my anxiety, but it’s too hard. Any tips?Anxious, Napier

Mindfulness is very trendy at the moment, and it’s not often you can say that about a psychological treatment. But it isn’t all incense, throw cushions and sitting cross-legged with your eyes shut.

So what is mindfulness and why is it so popular?

Mindfulness comes from Buddhist traditions and is a series of meditation techniques that help with mental focus, concentration and emotions by way of improving our ability to more actively control our attention.

It has been integrated into many different treatments since the mid 90s for chronic pain, depression and, perhaps most famously, borderline personality disorder via DBT (Dialectical Behaviour Therapy).

With practice we can all improve our ability to not let our mind “run away” with emotions, painful thoughts or difficult memories.

It’s particularly effective for anxiety and protecting against relapse in depression.

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