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Kate Spade’s Family ‘Disgusted’ After Designer’s Sister Claims Suicide ‘Wasn’t Unexpected’: Source

It appears that fame and money don’t protect you from mental illness.

Kate Spade’s Family ‘Disgusted’ After Designer’s Sister Claims Suicide ‘Wasn’t Unexpected’: Source

Kate Spade‘s family are at odds after the late designer’s death on Tuesday at age 55.

Spade’s older sister Reta Brosnahan Saffo, 57, made statements to multiple outlets on Tuesday night saying she believes her sister suffered from a mental illness for a number of years and that Spade’s suicide “was not unexpected by me.”

However, a source close to the family claims Brosnahan Saffo has long been estranged from her designer sister, whom the source says was as a “kind, generous, funny, warm and extremely private person.”

“The family is disgusted and saddened that at this time of great sorrow, Kate’s sister who has been estranged from the entire family for more than 10 years would choose to surface with unsubstantiated comments,” the source said to PEOPLE. “Her statements paint a picture of someone who didn’t know her at all.”

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Tumblr users are turning to this app to resist the urge to self-harm

The main focuses of DBT are mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance and interpersonal learning.

Mental Health Care

Tumblr users are turning to this app to resist the urge to self-harm
By Megan Farokhmanesh
Jan 19, 2018, 1:05pm EST

Tumblr user icantaffordadiary has been going through a difficult time. The Oregon-based teenager has a history of depression, self-harm, and suicidal thoughts spanning back to their elementary school days. “I’m going through a particularly rough patch right now, and I’ve been self-harming again,” the Tumblr user tells The Verge via DM. But they’ve found comfort in an unusual place: an app called Calm Harm that aims to help users work through their urges.

Calm Harm isn’t a new app; it launched in 2016 before being rebranded in July 2017. Its Google Play and App Store reviews are filled with people thanking its creators, or sharing their own success stories. But the app has found new popularity among Tumblr users, who are spreading the word to better help others. “Just wanted to let u guys know that there’s an app called calm harm that helps u resist the urge to self-harm,” wrote one user. “Please reblog this if you see it,” said another, who goes by ollzlollz. “This is a free app called calm harm and it literally just saved my life.” In a DM to The Verge, ollzlollz says that they discovered the app through a friend’s reblog.

Calm Harm offers a few simple solutions in the form of distraction techniques. The “Breathe” category, for example, will instruct you to exhale and inhale for a minute at at time, with the option to continue for as long as users need to. “Distract” gives you challenges to choose from, like counting backwards in sevens from 100, or thinking up a name for every letter of the alphabet. “The urge to self-harm is like a wave,” the app explains. “It feels the most powerful when you start wanting to do it.” It likens fighting off these urges like surfing on a wave: once you’ve ridden it out, the urge will fade.

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This Podcast Network Is Shutting Down Following Abuse Allegations Against Its Founder

Feral Media

In his statement, he outlined that he planned to take responsibility for his actions, validated many of Weems’ allegations, and addressed both his diagnosis with Borderline Personality Disorder and his drug and alcohol addictions.

This Podcast Network Is Shutting Down Following Abuse Allegations Against Its Founder
ELENA NICOLAOU
DECEMBER 27, 2017, 4:00 PM

If you’re a podcast fiend, chances are you’re familiar with at least one podcast housed under the Feral Audio umbrella. The podcast network, founded in 2012, is home to shows like Chelsea Peretti’s Call Chelsea Peretti, the beloved sleep-aiding daily show Sleep With Me, the feminist satire Reductress Presents: Mouth Time!, and We’re No Doctors, a show about health and medicine hosted by Busy Phillips and comedian Steve Agee.

Following a searing indictment of Feral Audio founder Dustin Marshall’s abusive behavior, the future availability of these podcasts is uncertain. On December 21, Marshall’s ex-girlfriend, Potty Mouth band member Abby Weems, posted a long overview of her relationship with Marshall. She claims Marshall was jealous, controlling, and violently unpredictable while they were dating due to his Borderline Personality Disorder, and exhibited behaviors of stalking after they broke up. “I want poeple, especially women, to know that he’s dangerous,” Weems wrote.

Four days later, Marshall responded to Weems’ allegations with a long post on his personal Tumblr. In his statement, he outlined that he planned to take responsibility for his actions, validated many of Weems’ allegations, and addressed both his diagnosis with Borderline Personality Disorder and his drug and alcohol addictions. By suggesting he would follow a strict treatment at on of the top California detoxing drug rehab centers in the following months. It’s clear that he is regretful and trying to make the right choices.

Marshall also stated he was stepping away from Feral Audio so that he could receive mental health treatment. “To Feral Audio artists, after six years, I can no longer have the pressure of running a company, continue this lifestyle and be mentally healthy…Since Feral Audio is forever married to my name, i [sic] am dissolving it so no dark cloud should ever be above your work,” he wrote.

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Holiday Skills for Dealing with Difficult Relatives and Friends

Hello, all. Below are two posts from the past that deal with Holiday dynamics. As the Holiday season goes on and Christmas and New Year’s approach, perhaps it’s time to review these and see what you can do to be more effective during the Holiday season?

Enjoy!

Bon

Just in time for the holidays

Family Dynamics Around the Holiday Table

 

Some mental health services are telling patients: ‘If you really wanted to kill yourself, you would have done it’

Like many others, Laura is made to feel like she is “attention seeking” and “manipulative” when she is suicidal or makes attempts on her life.

Some mental health services are telling patients: ‘If you really wanted to kill yourself, you would have done it’

When people do get to access crisis care, many feel that the emphasis is on getting rid of them as quickly as possible. Psychiatric inpatients have even been told to phone the Samaritans if they wish to talk

Jay Watts 4 days ago

People are encouraged to seek help if they are feeling suicidal like never before. Yet a deadly new mix of funding cuts and dangerous ideas about suicide are leaving many people with long-term conditions at greater risk.

Tom is 22 and has made a couple of serious attempts on his life following prolonged periods of depression. “When I regained consciousness after the last attempt”, he said, “I was told ‘If you really want to kill yourself, you would have done it’.” Tom, like many other people, feels like when he now contacts the crisis team, they treat him brusquely. “It is like they will only take me seriously if I actually die”, he continued. “I am told again and again ‘well if you really want to kill yourself, that’s your choice’.”

We are not talking about nuanced Schopenhauerian conversations about the right to die here. In the context of deep despair, the idea of choice is a deadly one, absolving the other party from doing everything they can to help the person in pain. If one is suicidal it is very difficult to feel any hope that things might change; one is often exhausted. It is crucial that hope is held actively by mental health professionals at these bleakest moments in a life.

Yet the idea of choice is being used increasingly to rebuff those who seek help when suicidal, a discursive move that an increasingly burnout mental health workforce appears to be using more often. This makes those suffering feel rejected and further alienated – key trigger factors to suicide.

Laura, 60, has also made multiple attempts on her life. She has been told that she should “take responsibility” when she is feeling suicidal, an idea fuelled by the neoliberal discourse of rights and responsibilities which has taken hold of mental health services. “There is a strict management plan and boundaries in place”, she said. “I am allowed to call the crisis team three times a week, and the calls are time-limited. When I do call, I am only allowed to talk about the present not the past”, she says. “If I try to talk about anything else, or call at another time, I am told I am ‘threatening suicide’.”

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Can Tylenol Really Relieve Hurt Feelings?

Among participants who had high levels of self-reported BPD features, those in the acetaminophen group showed more trust in their partners than those who had taken a placebo.

Can Tylenol Really Relieve ‘Hurt Feelings?’

Researchers say the ingredient acetaminophen can lessen extreme emotional responses, allowing people to get over rejection and other social feelings.

Is it possible that Tylenol can help alleviate not just physical pain, but social pain as well?

A growing body of research suggests that acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, may help dampen emotional responses.

In a study published earlier this fall, researchers from The Ohio State University found evidence that acetaminophen may reduce behavioral distrust in people with high levels of borderline personality disorder (BPD) features.

The investigators recruited 284 undergraduate students, each of whom they assessed for BPD features using a self-reported scale.

Following a double-blind procedure, the researchers randomly assigned each participant to receive either 1,000 milligrams of acetaminophen or a placebo.

Afterward, they asked participants to take part in an economic trust game.

Among participants who had high levels of self-reported BPD features, those in the acetaminophen group showed more trust in their partners than those who had taken a placebo.

Among participants with low levels of BPD features, there were no differences in trust observed between those who had taken acetaminophen and those who had taken a placebo.

“In line with past research, we found that people who self-reported higher levels of characteristics associated with BPD entrusted less money to anonymous partners,” Ian Roberts, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto and a lead study author, told Healthline.

“However,” he continued, “our study also found that, for those higher on BPD features, this distrust was reduced when they had been given acetaminophen as compared to a placebo.”

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