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Amber Portwood: Why I Changed My Mind About Having Another Baby

Diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder meant she had to be on medication that could harm a fetus.

Amber Portwood: Why I Changed My Mind About Having Another Baby

By Sophie Dweck and Carly Sloane November 8, 2017

A baby wasn’t supposed to be in Amber Portwood’s picture. Nine years after welcoming Leah at age 18, the star of MTV’s Teen Mom OG (season 7 premieres November 27, 9 p.m.) knew she couldn’t get pregnant. Diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder meant she had to be on medication that could harm a fetus.

But after calling off her wedding with Matt Baier and embarking on a new romance with Andrew Glennon four months ago, the Indiana native decided to ditch the pills. “I wanted to see if I was just unhappy because of the things that were going on in my life,” she explains in the new issue of Us Weekly. “I needed to see where I was in my head and it’s a beautiful thing because I just feel better. I feel happier and not so depressed.”

The star reveals that she decided to wean off the meds when she and Baier ended things. “It was rough, but it was a necessary thing to do,” she says. “I needed to see where I was in my head and it’s a beautiful thing because I just feel better.”

Why Amber Portwood Wanted to Have Another Baby

After hurricane, signs of a mental-health crisis haunt Puerto Rico

She has not been able to get any more information about her prognosis because her doctor’s offices have been closed.

After hurricane, signs of a mental-health crisis haunt Puerto Rico

Originally published November 13, 2017 at 2:41 pm Updated November 13, 2017 at 2:42 pm

Before the storm, Laura Rodriguez, 39, managed her borderline personality disorder without medication by relying on a strict routine: Early morning CrossFit workouts, long hours at work as an interior designer, going to bed early and never having guests at her home in Río Piedras.

But since Maria hit, her gym had been closed and her therapist had not been working. Neither had she.

“I’m constantly anxious,” she said. “I get these urges to be violent and I can’t control it.”

Memories of the storm were also tormenting her. She had been trapped inside her apartment for two days with her boyfriend, her mother and her mother’s cat. They used plastic tarps, towels, bedsheets and pieces of wood to try to plug the windows where rain water was surging through.

Without access to any of the balms that she typically relied on to stabilize her mood, she was worried about resorting to self-harm, an impulse that she had struggled to control since she was 8 years old. “What if it’s like three months, four months?” she said. “I cannot do this for so long.”

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Borderline Personality Disorder: Not Just an Adult Condition

Many start engaging in high-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse or self-harm, to help deal with the emptiness. The picture of BPD begins to emerge.

Borderline Personality Disorder: Not Just an Adult Condition

Batya Swift Yasgur, MA, LSW
November 20, 2017

To shed light on this ongoing controversy and its therapeutic implications, Psychiatry Advisor interviewed Carla Sharp, PhD, professor and director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Houston, Texas. Dr Sharp is the co-editor of the Handbook of Borderline Personality Disorder in Children and Adolescents2 and the co-founder of the Global Alliance for Early Prevention and Intervention for Borderline Personality Disorder (GAP) Initiative.

Psychiatry Advisor: What is the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of BPD in adolescents?

Dr Sharp: Ever since the first descriptions of BPD and specification of its diagnostic criteria in the DSM [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders], there was no restriction placed on diagnosing it in adolescents. Nevertheless, in our training programs, we were taught that one does not make a personality disorder diagnosis before age 18 years, even though the DSM allows for it.

One of the major arguments raised against diagnosis prior to age 18 is that, since the personality is still forming and identity is still being consolidated, a personality disorder cannot be accurately diagnosed.

A strong research base2 has been mounting, especially in the past 10 years, supporting the concept of a diagnosis of BPD in teens. It has been found that personality traits are as stable in children and adolescents as they are in adults. In other words, we have overestimated the stability of personality traits in adults. We used to see them as fixed and stable and postulated that they would be less stable in children and adolescents. But in reality, this is not the case. Traits wax and wane in both age groups.

Psychiatry Advisor: Adolescence is often a time of angst, stormy emotions, moodiness, and confusion. How do BPD traits differ from those of normal adolescence?

Dr Sharp: The first clue that a teenager may not be experiencing “normal” adolescent angst is that these traits likely began before adolescence and even in childhood. Children come into the world with a given temperament, and in the case of these children, they are unusually sensitive. I compare this type of child to a burn victim. When you touch the skin of a burn victim, he or she experiences pain that is far greater than the pain that might be experienced by an ordinary person from the same type of touch.

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SNL’s Pete Davidson says he’s been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder

The 23-year-old comedian said the diagnosis came after a stint in rehab and several instances of unexplained breakdowns that he initially attributed to his marijuana habit.

SNL’s Pete Davidson says he’s been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder

By RACHEL DESANTISNew York Daily News
Thu., Sept. 28, 2017

NEW YORK —Saturday Night Live’s “Resident Young Person” Pete Davidson revealed Monday he’s been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder.

The 23-year-old comedian explained his long-awaited diagnosis came after a stint in rehab and several instances of unexplained breakdowns that he initially attributed to his marijuana habit.

“I’ve been a pothead forever and I started in October, or September of last year, having these mental breakdowns where I would freak out like, rage, and not remember what happened after. Blind rage,” he told Marc Maron on the star’s podcast, WTF with Marc Maron.

Davidson decided to enter rehab to kick his drug habit, which he has previously said eased the symptoms of his Crohn’s disease.

Once in rehab, the doctors began to suspect that it was more than just the drugs causing his breakdowns, and prescribed him medicine to help treat what they thought could be bipolar disorder.

“I got out and then I started smoking weed again, and I’m on meds,” he said. “So I was feeling a little better, so two months go by and I just snapped. I was smoking weed every day, I just snapped and had a really bad mental breakdown. So I freaked out and I was like, it has to be the weed.”

Davidson cut out the pot and announced his sobriety, even filling in the folk at Saturday Night Live in a move that he called “very embarrass(ing).”

But after staying sober for nearly four months, he saw no change in his troubling behavior.

“I still felt the same, I still felt like something was f —up and something was wrong, and I found out I have BPD, which is borderline personality disorder,” he told Maron, explaining that one of his psychiatrists finally delivered the official diagnosis.

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Selena Gomez on Instagram Fatigue, Good Mental Health, and Stepping Back From the Limelight

“DBT has completely changed my life,” she says. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

Selena Gomez on Instagram Fatigue, Good Mental Health, and Stepping Back From the Limelight
MARCH 16, 2017 7:01 AM

by ROB HASKELL

On an unusually wet and windy evening in Los Angeles, Selena Gomez shows up at my door with a heavy bag of groceries. We’ve decided that tonight’s dinner will be a sort of tribute to the after-church Sunday barbecues she remembers from her Texan childhood. I already have chicken simmering in green salsa, poblano peppers blackening on the flames of the stove, and red cabbage wilting in a puddle of lime juice. All we need are Gomez’s famous cheesy potatoes—so bad they’re good, she promises. She sets down her Givenchy purse and brings up, in gaudy succession, a frozen package of Giant Eagle Potatoes O’Brien, a can of Campbell’s Cream of Chicken soup, a bag of shredded “Mexican cheese,” and a squat plastic canister of French’s Crispy Fried Onions.

“I bet you didn’t think we were going to get this real,” she says, and when I tell her that real isn’t the first word that springs to mind when faced with these ingredients, she responds with the booming battle-ax laugh that offers a foretaste of Gomez’s many enchanting incongruities.

But real is precisely what I was expecting from the 24-year-old Selena, just as her 110 million Instagram followers (Selenators, as they’re known) have come to expect it. Of course, celebrity’s old codes are long gone, MGM’s untouchable eggshell glamour having given way to the “They’re Just Like Us!” era of documented trips to the gas station and cellulite captured by telephoto lenses. But Gomez and her ilk have gone further still, using their smartphones to generate a stardom that seems to say not merely “I’m just like you” but “I am you.”

“People so badly wanted me to be authentic,” she says, laying a tortilla in sizzling oil, “and when that happened, finally, it was a huge release. I’m not different from what I put out there. I’ve been very vulnerable with my fans, and sometimes I say things I shouldn’t. But I have to be honest with them. I feel that’s a huge part of why I’m where I am.” Gomez traces her shift toward the unfiltered back to a song she released in 2014 called “The Heart Wants What It Wants,” a ballad about loving a guy she knows is bad news.

She sees her shrink five days a week and has become a passionate advocate of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, a technique developed to treat borderline personality disorder that is now used more broadly, with its emphasis on improving communication, regulating emotions, and incorporating mindfulness practices. “DBT has completely changed my life,” she says. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

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Borderline or Bipolar: Can 3 Questions Differentiate Them?

The Prisoner’s Dilemma paradigm separates the two, but that’s not practical as a clinical tool.

Borderline or Bipolar: Can 3 Questions Differentiate Them?

January 10, 2017 | Bipolar Disorder, Mood Disorders
By James Phelps, MD

Treatments for borderlinity and bipolarity are quite different. Which approach should you consider for a patient with impulsive risk-taking, episodes of irritability and hostility, fractured relationships, substance use problems, and severe depressions with brief phases of remission (maybe too good?) in between?

The Prisoner’s Dilemma paradigm separates the two,1 but that’s not practical as a clinical tool. What if you could pluck just 3 items from a standard bipolar screening questionnaire and increase your diagnostic certainty by 30% when faced with this common differential? That may be possible, based on a new study from Nassir Ghaemi and colleagues, led by Paul Vöhringer.2

Of course, replication studies will be needed before we can declare a new diagnostic approach is at hand. But in the meantime, I hope you might be curious: what 3 items from the good old Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ)3 were so discriminating?

Vöhringer et al2 obtained an MDQ from 260 patients whose diagnosis was then established by structured interview (the usual gold standard in this kind of study). Then they analyzed the individual MDQ items looking for those that discriminate well between bipolar disorders and borderline personality disorder. They found 3, a “clinical triad,” that had remarkable statistical power:

1. Elevated mood: “You felt so good or so hyper that other people thought you were not your normal self or you were so hyper that you got into trouble?”

2. Increased goal-directed activities: “You were much more active or did many more things than usual?”

3. Episodicity of mood symptoms: “If you checked YES to more than one of the above, have several of these ever happened during the same period of time?”

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