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Selena Gomez on Instagram Fatigue, Good Mental Health, and Stepping Back From the Limelight

“DBT has completely changed my life,” she says. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

Selena Gomez on Instagram Fatigue, Good Mental Health, and Stepping Back From the Limelight
MARCH 16, 2017 7:01 AM

by ROB HASKELL

On an unusually wet and windy evening in Los Angeles, Selena Gomez shows up at my door with a heavy bag of groceries. We’ve decided that tonight’s dinner will be a sort of tribute to the after-church Sunday barbecues she remembers from her Texan childhood. I already have chicken simmering in green salsa, poblano peppers blackening on the flames of the stove, and red cabbage wilting in a puddle of lime juice. All we need are Gomez’s famous cheesy potatoes—so bad they’re good, she promises. She sets down her Givenchy purse and brings up, in gaudy succession, a frozen package of Giant Eagle Potatoes O’Brien, a can of Campbell’s Cream of Chicken soup, a bag of shredded “Mexican cheese,” and a squat plastic canister of French’s Crispy Fried Onions.

“I bet you didn’t think we were going to get this real,” she says, and when I tell her that real isn’t the first word that springs to mind when faced with these ingredients, she responds with the booming battle-ax laugh that offers a foretaste of Gomez’s many enchanting incongruities.

But real is precisely what I was expecting from the 24-year-old Selena, just as her 110 million Instagram followers (Selenators, as they’re known) have come to expect it. Of course, celebrity’s old codes are long gone, MGM’s untouchable eggshell glamour having given way to the “They’re Just Like Us!” era of documented trips to the gas station and cellulite captured by telephoto lenses. But Gomez and her ilk have gone further still, using their smartphones to generate a stardom that seems to say not merely “I’m just like you” but “I am you.”

“People so badly wanted me to be authentic,” she says, laying a tortilla in sizzling oil, “and when that happened, finally, it was a huge release. I’m not different from what I put out there. I’ve been very vulnerable with my fans, and sometimes I say things I shouldn’t. But I have to be honest with them. I feel that’s a huge part of why I’m where I am.” Gomez traces her shift toward the unfiltered back to a song she released in 2014 called “The Heart Wants What It Wants,” a ballad about loving a guy she knows is bad news.

She sees her shrink five days a week and has become a passionate advocate of Dialectical Behavior Therapy, a technique developed to treat borderline personality disorder that is now used more broadly, with its emphasis on improving communication, regulating emotions, and incorporating mindfulness practices. “DBT has completely changed my life,” she says. “I wish more people would talk about therapy. We girls, we’re taught to be almost too resilient, to be strong and sexy and cool and laid-back, the girl who’s down. We also need to feel allowed to fall apart.”

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‘She was volatile, unstable and impulsive’: Marilyn Monroe most likely had borderline personality disorder, new book reveals

Monroe & BPD?Marilyn Monroe suffered from severe mental distress. Her symptoms included a feeling of emptiness, a split or confused identity, extreme emotional volatility, unstable relationships, and an impulsivity that drove her to drug addiction and suicide all textbook characteristics of a condition called borderline personality disorder.

‘She was volatile, unstable and impulsive’: Marilyn Monroe most likely had borderline personality disorder, new book reveals

While for many, Marilyn Monroe is one of the most enduring sex symbols of our time, behind her perfect curves and sultry personality, lay a complex and troubled woman. And more than that – it is likely that the iconic actress suffered from borderline personality disorder, says science journalist Claudia Kalb.

In a new book that examines, posthumously, the psychological conditions suffered by iconic celebrities and creatives, Kalb writes that while Monroe ‘yearned for love and stability’ she ‘often lashed out at those she cared about’.

She explains: ‘What is clear is that Monroe suffered from severe mental distress. Her symptoms included a feeling of emptiness, a split or confused identity, extreme emotional volatility, unstable relationships, and an impulsivity that drove her to drug addiction and suicide all textbook characteristics of a condition called borderline personality disorder.’

Marilyn, who was born Norma Jeane Mortenson, had 12 sets of foster parents, and according to a newscast at the time, she was quoted as saying in her last interview that she was ‘never used to being happy, so it wasn’t something she ever took for granted’. The beloved actress had roles in 23 films, which grossed a combined total of $200 million since her debut in 1950.

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Andy Warhol Was a Hoarder: Inside the Minds of History’s Great Personalities


Was Andy Warhol a hoarder? Did Einstein have autism? Was Frank Lloyd Wright a narcissist? In this surprising, inventive, and meticulously researched look at the evolution of mental health, acclaimed health and science journalist Claudia Kalb gives readers a glimpse into the lives of high-profile historic figures through the lens of modern psychology, weaving groundbreaking research into biographical narratives that are deeply embedded in our culture. From Marilyn Monroe’s borderline personality disorder to Charles Darwin’s anxiety, Kalb provides compelling insight into a broad range of maladies, using historical records and interviews with leading mental health experts, biographers, sociologists, and other specialists. Packed with intriguing revelations, this smart narrative brings a new perspective to one of the hottest new topics in today’s cultural conversation.
New From: $8.54 USD In Stock

‘I am broken inside’: Revisiting lessons from Jiah Khan’s death and suicide note

“All I want now is to go to sleep and never wake up again. I am nothing.”

‘I am broken inside’: Revisiting lessons from Jiah Khan’s death and suicide note

Rachel Hercman Aug 25, 2015 at 12:09 pm

Jiah Khan’s suicide is now in news again because of Sooraj’s impending movie release. Whether it is a genuine attempt to clear the air or just a PR act, we do not know. However, when we remember the young, beautiful, famous actress deciding she had no other solution than to take her own life, it is a testament to the amount of emotional pain she must have been experiencing.

Her suicide note portrays a curious paradox of a relationship characterised by unrequited love and abuse. The pain and turmoil is palpable and it seems like there should be tears dripping down from the words. Jiah truly speaks the universal language of a heartbroken lover; anger, demoralisation, disappointment, despair, and total emptiness.

ut as sad and heart-breaking this tragedy may be, life will go on and the story will soon become old news. However, if women around the world can take a lesson or two from Jiah’s experience, the tragedy can make women stronger and in some cases, avoid some of the unfortunate circumstances she had in her life.

‘I am running away from everything.’

It’s normal that when life is painful, running away feels like the right thing to do to alleviate the discomfort. For Jiah, running away meant killing herself. For some people it means having an affair; or never leaving the house; or moving somewhere impulsively; or isolating from all relationships, even ones with close friends and family.

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A Psychiatrist Explains What Kristen Wiig’s ‘Welcome to Me’ Gets Right About Mental Illness

People with borderline personality disorder often exhibit reckless behavior — including impulsive spending.

A Psychiatrist Explains What Kristen Wiig’s ‘Welcome to Me’ Gets Right About Mental Illness

Gwynne Watkins

In the funny, fascinating drama Welcome to Me (now in select theaters and available on VOD), Kristen Wiig plays Alice Klieg, a woman with borderline personality disorder who uses lottery winnings to produce a television show entirely about herself. Alice is an unusual movie character, sympathetic in her desire to be loved like Oprah, yet off-putting in her bizarre, irrational behavior. But does she provide an accurate portrait of borderline personality disorder, a condition characterized by unstable moods, behavior and relationships?

According to Harvard Medical School psychiatrist Dr. Steven Schlozman, she does indeed. Furthermore, Welcome to Me offers a much more sympathetic, realistic take on BPD than most Hollywood films, which have generally characterized it as a disorder of stalkers and serial killers (i.e. Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction, Kathy Bates in Misery). “The compelling storyline of the rageful, murderous person, who is presumed to have BPD, finds its way into movies a lot,” says Schlozman, “but people with what we’d call BPD are hardly ever violent, except maybe towards themselves.” We asked Schlozman to explain how Wiig’s actions in Welcome to Me — from her TV obsession to her angry meltdowns — jibe with her diagnosis.

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Kristen Wiig has Borderline Personality Disorder, hosts her own talk show in ‘Welcome to Me’ trailer

Woman with Borderline Personality Disorder who wins millions in the lottery and decides to use her funds to create her own talk show.

Kristen Wiig has Borderline Personality Disorder, hosts her own talk show in ‘Welcome to Me’ trailer

By Will Ashton

In 2014, Kristen Wiig fully immersed herself into dramatic territory, while still keeping her funny bone in check. Her turn opposite Bill Hader in The Skeleton Twins earned her tons of praise, and she also received a lot of acclaim in the festival circuit for Welcome to Me.

Now, it appears the world will see her latest dramedy performance soon, as the trailer for the latter new movie hit the web today.

The promo, via Film Divider, highlights the new movie, which centers on a woman with Borderline Personality Disorder who wins millions in the lottery and decides to use her funds to create her own talk show. This is in addition to her ditching her treatment, going off her meds and living in a casino.

The film also stars James Marsden, Tim Robbins, Joan Cusack and Wes Bentley. It is directed by Shira Piven, the wife of fellow filmmaker Adam McKay (the Anchorman movies). McKay produces this alongside Will Ferrell through their Gary Sanchez Productions banner.

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A Musical About Borderline Personality Disorder

Rehearsing scenes from “Borderline,” a musical: Cecilia Dintino is an actual clinical psychologist; Jill Powell, an actress with borderline personality disorder, is one of her patients.

Therapist and Patient Share a Theater of Hurt
By COREY KILGANNONNOV. 5, 2014

It was not easily recognizable as therapy, these two women screaming at each other, their faces inches apart, during a rehearsal in a basement space in Greenwich Village.

The patient, a blond woman with spiky hair and spiky heels: Jill Powell, 49, an actress who had fallen on hard times. The other woman, more reserved in dress and demeanor, was Cecilia Dintino, 56, a clinical psychologist.

But this particular scene had a twist; Ms. Dintino is an actual psychologist and Ms. Powell is one of her actual patients.

The therapist and the patient were rehearsing a show called “Borderline,” which features the two women playing themselves and dealing with Ms. Powell’s lifelong struggle with borderline personality disorder.

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