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When Hope is Not Enough, Second Edition: A how-to guide for living with and loving someone with Borderline Personality Disorder
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Personality disorders: a new statement of quality in treatment

Borderline personality disorder is characterized by significant instability of interpersonal relationships, self‑image and mood, and impulsive behavior. There is sometimes a pattern of rapid fluctuation from periods of confidence to despair, with fear of abandonment, rejection, and a strong tendency towards suicidal thinking and self‑harm.

Personality disorders: a new statement of quality in treatment

NICE was asked by NHS England to develop a quality standard on 2 specific personality disorders, that is, borderline personality disorder and antisocial personality disorder. Borderline and antisocial personality disorders are 2 distinctive conditions that affect people differently and have different care pathways. The diagnosis affects how the condition is managed and the interventions and services that are appropriate. The 2 disorders have been grouped into 1 quality standard to reflect similarity in approaches, not to imply that the 2 conditions are the same.

Antisocial personality disorder can only be diagnosed in adults, whereas borderline personality disorder can also be diagnosed in young people post puberty. For borderline personality disorder, statements within this quality standard apply to young people post puberty as well as adults recognising that young people would be supported by age‑appropriate services (child and adolescent mental health services).

Borderline personality disorder

Borderline personality disorder is characterised by significant instability of interpersonal relationships, self‑image and mood, and impulsive behaviour. There is sometimes a pattern of rapid fluctuation from periods of confidence to despair, with fear of abandonment, rejection, and a strong tendency towards suicidal thinking and self‑harm. Borderline personality disorder is often comorbid with depression, anxiety, eating disorders, post‑traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and drug misuse, and bipolar disorder (the symptoms of which can often be confused with borderline personality disorder).

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